Spend, save and support your football team - Credit cards - News - Moneyfacts


Spend, save and support your football team

Spend, save and support your football team

Category: Credit cards

Updated: 12/01/2015
First Published: 13/08/2007

This article was correct at the time of publication. It is now over 6 months old so the content may be out of date.

It doesn't seem five minutes since the last football season ended, yet here we are in the second week of August, ready for the big 'kick off' once more.

With many Premiership clubs being taken over by multi-millionaires from various parts of the globe, their financial position is pretty much secure for the time being. However it is a totally different picture when you look outside the top-flight clubs, with many with finances balanced on a knife-edge.

If you want to do your bit for your favourite team, why not consider a credit card or savings account that supports your club, by giving them a percentage of profits?

Credit cards

It's not just savings accounts that can help your team; credit cards are another way of donating and MBNA offers over 70 football affinity cards.

The Barclaycard Football credit card lets you purchase your season ticket and then repay what you can afford each month without having to paying any interest.

With tickets for some of the top sides running into many hundreds of pounds, having to cover the cost in one go can make a pretty hefty dent in your pay packet, so it makes sense to spread the cost, especially if it's interest free.

The card also offers 0% interest free borrowing for 12 months on balances transferred and allows you to collect reward points to redeem at JJB Sports or against the latest team shirt or football merchandise. Using the card also enters you for some exclusive prize offers including the chance to win Premiership tickets.

Savings accounts

The interest rates paid on these types of savings accounts are not going to be as high as those that head the best buy tables, but you can still obtain a decent rate of return and benefit your team from some much needed additional revenue.

Britannia Building Society and Norwich and Peterborough Building Society offer savings accounts that support league teams, paying three per cent or more from a balance of £1, with higher returns payable on larger balances. You can earn more from other types of savings accounts, but the trade off is that up to 1.25% in interest will be paid to your team each year.

The extra funding clubs receive via their supporters' savings really can make a difference. Last season Norwich and Peterborough Building Society presented a cheque for £308,624 to Norwich City as a result of the thousands of loyal fans investing in the 'Canary account'. The total handed over by Norwich & and Peterborough to Norwich City so far is an incredible £2,383,371.

Most football fans are proud to wear their team colours, so why not take that loyalty one step further by taking a savings account or credit card that has a positive impact on your team's finances!

Disclaimer: Information is correct as of the date of publication (shown at the top of this article). Any products featured may be withdrawn by their provider or changed at any time.

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