Moody’s downgrades UK credit rating - Economy - News - Moneyfacts


Moody’s downgrades UK credit rating

Moody’s downgrades UK credit rating

Category: Economy

Updated: 25/02/2013
First Published: 25/02/2013

This article was correct at the time of publication. It is now over 6 months old so the content may be out of date.

The UK's AAA credit rating has been downgraded for the first time in over thirty years, indicating that the country's debt and economic situation remains in the doldrums.

The ratings agency Moody's stated that it reduced the AAA rating due to continued weakness in the nation's medium-term growth outlook and expects sluggish growth to extend into the second half of this decade.

Moody's added that the UK's creditworthiness remained particularly high because of its credit strengths, such as possessing a highly competitive and well-diversified economy and having a strong history of fiscal consolidation.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, said the downgrading was a "stark reminder of the debt problems facing our country".

Pound sterling fell to a two and a half-year low against the US dollar following Moody's announcement last Friday.

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