Vote now in the Consumer Moneyfacts Survey! - Economy - News - Moneyfacts


Vote now in the Consumer Moneyfacts Survey!

Vote now in the Consumer Moneyfacts Survey!

Category: Economy

Updated: 07/10/2013
First Published: 07/10/2013

This article was correct at the time of publication. It is now over 6 months old so the content may be out of date.

Tell us what you think of personal financial providers in the UK to stand the chance of winning £1,000!

The Consumer Moneyfacts Survey launches today, with the aim of giving the UK's millions of customers a voice and a chance to reflect how they feel about the range of financial products available to them.

Winning financial providers will be announced at an awards ceremony in January 2014.

The survey will request that respondents rate each provider that they have done business with in the preceding 12 months. Taking an average score for each provider, Moneyfacts will ensure fairness across responses from different sized organisations.

There are three sections:

  • Family finance,
  • Household finance
  • Personal finance

It should only take you 5-10 minutes to complete all three. Each completed survey allows you one entry into our prize draw to win one of three £1,000 prizes!

"When we choose to give our business to any company we don't just want excellent, affordable products, we also want to feel important to them. We want to feel looked after; we want to enjoy the experience. Some finance companies are great at this, others only play at it," said Editor Sylvia Waycot.

"Collectively, we have the power to change that, so join us by giving your feedback on those providers that excel at customer service and those that could do with a word in their ear!"

Vote here for your chance to win £1,000

Disclaimer: Information is correct as of the date of publication (shown at the top of this article). Any products featured may be withdrawn by their provider or changed at any time.

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