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5 ways to cut your energy bills down to size

5 ways to cut your energy bills down to size

Category: Gas and electricity

Updated: 06/06/2014
First Published: 05/06/2014

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This article was correct at the time of publication. It is now over 6 months old so the content may be out of date.

Despite the UK edging ever-closer to summer, energy costs are still high on the agenda. You don't want to pay more than you need to, particularly if you're finding it tough to balance the books, but there are ways to cut your energy bills down to size…

  1. Go green. Today is World Environment Day, so it's only right to mention the option of going green. There are plenty of ways you can do that too. Perhaps the simplest is to reduce your energy usage as much as you can, thereby reducing your carbon footprint as well as your bills. But, you might like to consider a green tariff too, as Mark Todd, director of energyhelpline.com, says: When people think of 'going green' they often think it is going to cost them the earth. However, doing your bit for the environment can actually save you money, [as] many green tariffs are actually cheaper than the most common energy tariffs."
  2. Pay by direct debit. Changing your payment method can often make a huge amount of difference, and many suppliers will give you great discounts simply by setting up a direct debit. In fact, research from Ofgem recently revealed that those who use pre-payment meters are charged, on average, £80 more per year than those who pay by direct debit, so it could make a huge amount of difference to your outgoings.
  3. Insulate. Making sure your home is properly insulated is absolutely essential, and it can transform your energy bills too. This applies throughout the house as well – not only do you need to check your loft insulation but you'll want to plug any draughts in your home, so check for gaps around doors and windows and consider installing a chimney draught excluder – anywhere that heat can escape through needs to be plugged.
  4. Get in control. Installing a thermostat (if you don't already have one) can shave a huge amount off your annual bills, putting you in complete control and letting you determine where – and when – the heat comes on. Even turning the thermostat down by a single degree can lead to savings of around £65 a year, and if you feel the chill you could always add extra layers rather than turning up the heat. You'll want to control your energy usage too, and even simple things like switching off appliances and lights when not in use can make the world of difference.
  5. Compare tariffs. Finding the right tariff is perhaps one of the best things you can do, and if you switch to a low-cost fixed rate you could keep your bills low for as long as possible. It'll help you budget effectively whilst saving you some cash, so use our comparison tool to find the best deal and see how much you could save.

What Next?

Beat the energy price rises you could save up to £370 on gas and electricity for your home

Disclaimer: Information is correct as of the date of publication (shown at the top of this article). Any products featured may be withdrawn by their provider or changed at any time.

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