Jury out on absolute return funds - Investments - News - Moneyfacts


Jury out on absolute return funds

Jury out on absolute return funds

Category: Investments

Updated: 16/07/2009
First Published: 15/07/2009

This article was correct at the time of publication. It is now over 6 months old so the content may be out of date.

A survey from Investment Life & Pensions Moneyfacts has raised concerns over whether absolute return funds have been delivering on their promise to produce positive returns each year.

Although the survey found that the average absolute return fund has delivered positive growth in each of the last three years, there are a worrying number of funds that have fallen short of their objectives.

Only 12 of the 20 funds with at least a one year history are in positive territory with regards to their underlying performance over that time, while the number drops to just eight when charges are taken into account.

Of considerable concern, however, will be the extent to which some of the funds have missed their goal. Those entrusting £1,000 into the worst performing absolute return fund a year ago will have seen their investment slump in value to £819.

Despite notable disappointments, there are still some encouraging signs for the absolute return sector. The undoubted success story of the sector is the CF Octopus Partner (Absolute Return) fund having posted growth of 51.74 per cent, or a return of £1,442 on a £1,000 investment made a year earlier, taking into account the impact of charges. It is also the second best performing unit trust/OEIC fund overall over the last 12 months, second only to Neptune's Japan Opportunities fund.

Meanwhile, in terms of the sector overall, an average return of 2.74 per cent (without charges) means absolute return is the third best performing sector of the past year, comparing favourably with an average 15 per cent loss across all funds.

Richard Eagling, Editor of Investment Life & Pensions Moneyfacts, said: "With many funds still in their infancy, it is perhaps too early and a little unfair to pass a conclusive judgement on many of the funds.

"It is also worth bearing in mind is that no investment vehicle can guarantee a positive return. However, given this is the overriding aim of all absolute return funds, that so many have fallen so far short of the mark is somewhat of a surprise."

Disclaimer: Information is correct as of the date of publication (shown at the top of this article). Any products featured may be withdrawn by their provider or changed at any time.

Related Articles

Pound plummets as FTSE soars

A second significant fall in the pound has taken place. While this drop may be unhappy news for people who are about to go on holiday, it has given the FTSE 100 quite a boost, as it has passed the 7,000 mark for the second time in as many years.

Would you risk the stock market for £400,000?

It’s becoming increasingly difficult to secure decent returns on cash savings these days, yet we all know that investing in cash is the safest option. But would you risk that level of security for the chance of a £400,000 profit?

Don’t be a victim of investment fraud

Low savings rates have led many of us to desperately scour the market in hopes of finding a deal that will pay more. However, this search means that more and more savers are being tempted by unfamiliar investments.