Revealed: the energy price postcode lottery - Utilities - News - Moneyfacts

News

Revealed: the energy price postcode lottery

Revealed: the energy price postcode lottery

Category: Utilities

Updated: 01/05/2014
First Published: 02/12/2011

MONEYFACTS ARCHIVE
This article was correct at the time of publication. It is now over 6 months old so the content may be out of date.

Energy price research from independent comparison site, energyhelpline.com, has revealed a startling price difference between different regions of the UK.

Average costs range from £1,373 in Merseyside and North Wales, to £1,282 in North Scotland – a near 7% difference in the amount paid by customers.

See the average energy prices where you live:

See the average energy prices where you live
(Click on the image to see larger version)

Because of this energy price variance, the amount you can save by switching energy tariffs is big as well – with the biggest saving available in Eastern England at £334. However, even the lowest saving isn't to be sniffed at in Northern Scotland at £245 saved off a typical household bill.

See the possible savings available in your area.

Compare the best energy prices

Disclaimer: Information is correct as of the date of publication (shown at the top of this article). Any products featured may be withdrawn by their provider or changed at any time.

Related Articles

Water bill increase criticised

Typical water and sewage bills across England and Wales are set to rise by £2 this year to an average of £389, Water UK has announced, but despite the increase equating to less than 1% year-on-year, the move has been heavily criticised.

Will you get A Better Deal from your bills?

It’s the time of year when the heating gets turned up and many of us re-evaluate our broadband packages, but this could all take its toll on utility bills. The Government has announced initiatives to reduce costs in response, but will you benefit?

Brits pay more for TV than council tax

How much do you spend on entertainment every month? Given the rise of streaming and subscription-based services, not to mention the cost of a typical TV package, it could be quite a lot – and many consumers actually spend more on TV than council tax.
 
Close