Best Savings Rates 2018 - Compare Savings Accounts | moneyfacts.co.uk

Best Savings Rates

  - Our unbiased tables show the absolute best rates from over 1,700 savings accounts. We've compared over 97% of the market to find you the best accounts you can trust.
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AER Notice / Term Minimum Investment Account Opening Search all 1768 accounts
     
  Easy Access - no bonus  

1.30%
None £100
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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  Easy Access with bonus  

1.32%
Inc 0.47% bonus for 12 months
None £1
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 
     
  Fixed Rate Bonds  

2.70%
5 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.65%
5 Year Bond £2000
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. Yes
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.60%
expected rate
7 Year Bond £25000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.55%
expected rate
5 Year Bond £25000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.31%
3 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.30%
expected rate
3 Year Bond £25000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.25%
3 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.22%
3 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.21%
3 Year Bond £500
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.11%
30 Month Bond £500
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.10%
expected rate
2 Year Bond £25000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

2.00%
expected rate
18 Month Bond £25000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

1.95%
expected rate
1 Year Bond £25000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 

1.95%
18 Month Bond £25000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 
     
  Notice Accounts  

1.51%
expected rate
90 Day £250
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. Yes
  4. Yes
Details...
Go to Site
 

1.50%
120 Day £1000
  1. No
  2. Yes
  3. Yes
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 
     
  Monthly Income Accounts  

1.40%
95 Day £5000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 
     
     
  Sponsored Products  

1.80%
1 Year Bond £5000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

1.85%
18 Month Bond £500
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.80%
1 Year Bond £25000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

1.70%
1 Year Bond £500
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.20%
12 Month Bond £100
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.70%
1 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

1.50%
12 Month Bond £5000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

1.70%
1 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.66%
1 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.80%
1 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.45%
1 Year Bond £10000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.45%
1 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.10%
9 Month Bond £100
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.04%
2 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.03%
2 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.00%
2 Year Bond £500
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.95%
2 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.91%
2 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.00%
2 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.65%
2 Year Bond £10000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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1.70%
24 Month Bond £5000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.05%
3 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

1.70%
3 Year Bond £10000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

1.61%
3 Year Bond £500
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.45%
expected rate
4 Year Bond £25000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

2.52%
4 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

2.10%
4 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

2.25%
5 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

2.30%
5 Year Bond £500
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

2.16%
5 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

1.86%
5 Year Bond £500
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

0.95%
6 Month Bond £5000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

1.00%
None £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Easy Access - no bonus Best Buys
 

0.20%
Instant £25000
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. No
  4. Yes
Details...
Go to Site View Easy Access - no bonus Best Buys
 

0.10%
Instant £1
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. No
  4. Yes
Details...
Go to Site View Easy Access - no bonus Best Buys
 

0.80%
35 Day £5000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Notice Accounts Best Buys
 

1.05%
30 Day £1000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Notice Accounts Best Buys
 

0.75%
None £1
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Easy Access - no bonus Best Buys
 

2.16%
3 Year Bond £1000
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Fixed Rate Bonds Best Buys
 

1.40%
95 Day £5000
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site View Notice Accounts Best Buys
 

Our team of experts have chosen those savings accounts they believe to be Best Buys. A selection of those, for which we have arranged links are shown above, whilst products shown with a yellow background are sponsored products.

Eligible deposits with UK institutions are protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme up to a maximum level of protection of £85,000 per person per institution.

Disclaimer:
All rates subject to change without notice. Please check all rates and terms before investing or borrowing.
Search All Savings Accounts >>
 

Savings accounts: things to bear in mind...

Before immersing yourself in our selection of the best savings accounts and best savings rates, you may want to know what exactly these accounts are, and how they work. That's why we've gathered and answered the most frequently asked questions you may have about savings accounts.

On this page:

  1. What is a savings account?
  2. What types of savings accounts are there?
  3. Interest rates for savings
  4. How many savings accounts can I have?
  5. How is interest paid?
  6. What information do you need to provide to apply for a savings account?
  7. What are the best savings accounts?
  8. How does inflation affect savings?
  9. How are savings taxed?
  10. What are the best interest rates for savings over £100,000?
  11. What are the best savings accounts for over 50s?

What is a savings account?

This may seem like an easy question; savings accounts are accounts you save your money in, right? However, there's more to these handy products than that. Aside from a nice, safe place to stash your cash, savings accounts offer a rate of interest on the cash you deposit, meaning you'll be able to get more money out than you put in.

In exchange for storing your money and paying out interest, providers get a cache of funds that they can use to provide loans to other customers, in the form of mortgages for example. Considering these banks and building societies are getting something out of your savings as well, they should not charge you any fees to save with them. If you find a provider whose savings accounts aren't free to use, you should be both very surprised and cautious.

Additionally, in the UK these funds are usually protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS). This means that up to £85,000 of your savings are covered should the bank or building society you've chosen to stash your cash with go bust. This is per banking group, too, so you could spread your funds around multiple providers to keep all of it protected against the worst-case scenario. Just remember to check that they're part of the scheme before you sign up.

So, the key characteristics of savings accounts are that they offer to keep your cash safe while allowing you to get some extra money through an agreed-upon (variable or fixed) rate of interest on your pot. All other aspects of these accounts will depend on the type you choose and the restrictions that providers put on their products.

What types of savings accounts are there?

This leads us to the different account types that are available. Depending on your needs, you might want to get a few accounts to take advantage of all the different features on offer. You can choose from:

Easy access accounts

These accounts allow you to add and withdraw your money whenever you want (though some accounts may still have some access restrictions). Because of this, they tend to offer lower interest rates than most other accounts. A sub-set of these accounts include a fixed bonus rate for a certain period, which could make them a safer bet. An easy access account can be the ideal place for an emergency pot.

Fixed rate bonds

Fixed bonds require you to set your money aside for a set period of time - typically from one year up to seven or more - and they usually won't allow you to add to your pot over that time (bar the occasional window on opening the account). You may be able to access your funds for a little while or on a severe interest penalty, but many of these accounts will not allow any access at all until the full term of the bond is up. In exchange, they do tend to offer the highest available rates of all standard savings products.

Notice accounts

In many ways, notice accounts are a halfway house between easy access and fixed rate savings. They may allow unlimited additions, but withdrawals will usually require the stated notice period, which can range from 30 days to six months. Sometimes savers will even be able to get early access on the loss of a certain number of days' interest (usually equivalent to the notice period). As they live between easy access and fixed, the rates on offer also tend to sit between the two.

Monthly interest accounts

As the name suggests, monthly interest accounts pay out interest on a monthly basis, allowing consumers to use their savings interest as income. These accounts may require notice or could be easy access. They will likely offer saving rates that are less than those offered on annual interest-paying accounts.

Regular savings accounts

These accounts tend to offer the highest rates, but also come with the most restrictions. They will have a time limit to them, as well as an upper investment limit, and they'll usually require a certain number of deposits per year. They tend to be ideal for those looking to save small amounts every month, to develop a savings habit or save up for a specific purchase.

ISAs

ISAs, short for individual savings accounts, are a specialised sub-section of savings products that are exempt from taxation. There are easy access as well as fixed rate ISAs available, which is why they sit in a separate section on our website. You can find out more about them in our guide on the subject.

Interest rates for savings

Aside from these main account types, you will want to look out for the type of rate on offer. Variable rates can change throughout the life of the product, while fixed rates are set until the term ends. Easy access rates tend to be variable, while fixed bond rates will naturally be fixed. The other account types can be both.

Once you know what type of account you're looking for, it's a matter of looking at the rate, investment limit and account management methods to see which savings deal best suits you.

How many savings accounts can I have?

There is no limit to the number of savings accounts you can have. There are, however, certain restrictions in regards to ISAs, which are explained in our guides. It's also important to note that you can only earn £1,000 in interest per year across all your savings accounts before you may have to start paying tax on it (dependant on the level of income you have from other sources. The limit is £500 for higher rate taxpayers, while additional rate taxpayers get no tax-free buffer), due to the Personal Savings Allowance introduced in 2016.

Not only can you have multiple accounts, it's generally prudent to have a few different kinds. For instance, you might want a fixed rate bond for your longer-term savings, an easy access account for your emergency pot, and a regular saver to save up for your next holiday.

How is interest paid?

On most accounts, interest is paid once a year, either on a set date or on the anniversary of the account opening. Some accounts, including monthly interest accounts, will pay out interest once a month. Some even pay interest quarterly, while short-term fixed rate bonds with a term of 15 or 18 months may pay out on maturity, which would be more than a year away.

You can easily find out when interest is paid by clicking on the 'Details' of the account you're interested in. As to where the interest goes, this will depend on whether the account requires interest to be paid away or not. If it does, you will get the funds straight into whichever account you have nominated. If interest is compounded instead, the interest will be added to the savings account itself, allowing you to see your pot grow.

Considering all these different options, it's not easy to determine what the best savings account to gain interest would be. There's obviously the rate to consider, but you should also ask yourself if you want a monthly income from your savings, or you'd prefer to get as much interest as possible via compounding. The top savings rate may look attractive, but always consider if it's got the right terms for your needs before committing.

What information do you need to provide to apply for a savings account?

Most accounts will require you to provide not just your basic information - your full name, date of birth, address and such - but also a current account that they can use to link to the savings account. Some providers may even ask you to open a current account with them before you can get one of their savings accounts.

This nominated account will be used not only as the default from which you can add to your savings - if allowed - but also as the account where your savings will end up if you decide to close your savings product. Even if you don't get asked to link a current account, you will generally have to provide an account from which to transfer the minimum investment, as you won't be able to open a savings account without putting some money into it.

What are the best savings accounts?

Given the vast number of savings products out there, spread across all manner of different types, it may be difficult to determine which is the best one. Indeed, you may be disappointed to find that there's not a single best savings deal we can point to as the absolute number one.

Sure, there will be the account with the highest interest rate, and that might be perfect for you, but it won't be right for everyone. Standard high interest savings accounts in the form of fixed rate bonds are good for those who have a lot of cash to put away and don't mind losing access to their money for five years or more.

Alternatively, you might want a high interest savings account in the form of a regular saver, which, as stated above, will offer potentially the highest rates of interest you can find, but won't usually allow you to put aside more than £500 per month. As you can see, even picking out the highest interest savings account isn't straightforward.

To find the best deal for you, you will need to know how to compare savings accounts. Once you know what type of account you want, you can look at the best savings account interest rates available in the Best Buys, but you may want to look a bit closer before you decide. How will you be able to open and manage the account? What is the minimum investment limit, and do you have enough? Is it a variable or fixed rate? Is early access allowed? How is interest paid out?

These are all important questions to ask before you pick an account, and only you will be able to answer them. So, instead of looking at who has the best savings rate, see who offers the top rate among those that fit your criteria. You may well find that this is a bank you've never heard of before, but don't be afraid - all banks and building societies featured on our charts are covered under a Depositor Protection Scheme, so your savings will be protected (up to £85,000 per person per bank for UK providers) no matter where you place them.

How does inflation affect savings?

Inflation, which measures the increased price of goods and services, affects the cost of everything you buy. As inflation rises, so does the price of your groceries, fuel etc. Because of this, you'll want an interest rate that is above the rate of inflation, so your money doesn't lose its spending power.

When inflation is greater than the average interest rate, or (in the worst case) all savings rates fall short of the Consumer Price Index - the most commonly used measure of inflation - you will essentially be getting negative interest. That's why it's always a good idea to make sure your savings interest rate is higher than the rate of inflation, if possible.

How are savings taxed?

Since April 2016, basic rate taxpayers are able to earn up to £1,000 in savings interest tax-free, while 40% taxpayers can get £500 in tax-free interest and anyone paying 45% tax will have no tax-free allowance. Any amounts of interest above these tax-free amounts are taxed at the marginal rate applying to that person (20%, or 45%). (Rates on tax in Scotland may differ).

This means that if you earn interest above £1,000 (or £500), you'll need to declare it to HM Revenue & Customs. Cash ISAs, in contrast, are tax-free regardless of your tax status, so this is always a good first port of call for large savings pots.

What are the best interest rates for savings over £100,000?

If you have more than £100,000 to put into a savings account, you should be aware, first of all, that you will likely have to pay tax on the interest that you get, as you would breach the limit with a rate as low as 1%. To that end, the best savings vehicle for you might be an ISA, where you'll be able to enjoy the build-up of your interest without worrying about tax.

However, ISAs will only allow you to put in a certain amount per year (£20,000 for the 2017/18 tax year), so you'd still have £80,000 to stash away. With this, you might want to put £20,000 away in a one-year fixed bond ready to be put into a new ISA or added to an existing one the following year, keep some of the rest in an easy access account, and put the remainder in a longer-term bond or even invest it on the stock market.

Depending on the savings rates at the time, there's no guarantee that you won't have to pay some tax on your interest, but the amount of interest you get may just outweigh the tax you'd have to pay - seek professional advice if you're not sure.

What are the best savings accounts for over 50s?

While there are a few savings accounts available that are exclusively for people over 50, or even 60, these won't necessarily offer the best savings account rates. Indeed, it might very well be that the account at the top of the Best Buy charts is also the best account for you. Just check that it can be managed in the way that you are most comfortable with, and that it allows the level of access you desire.

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