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Whole of Market Savings Account Comparison

  - Want to decide for yourself which savings account is the best? Don’t worry – use our Savings Comparison tool to find all the best UK savings accounts.

  • What type of account are you looking for:
    Fixed Rate Bonds
    Easy Access/Notice Accounts
    Fixed Rate ISAs
    Easy Access/Notice ISAs
  • Account Holder:
    Age:
    Investment: £
    How do you want to save:
    Interest Paid:

Searching all 1631 savings products, the results will include all available savings accounts that meet your search criteria,
with those we have arranged apply links for to be shown first. To reorder the columns, simply click on your preferred column heading.

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Up to 3 products
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AER Account Type Notice / Term Interest Paid Account Opening Apply Today

2.21%
Fixed 5 Year Bond Monthly
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.21%
Fixed 5 Year Bond Anniversary
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.16%
expected rate
Fixed 36 Month Bond Quarterly
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. Yes
  4. Yes
Details...
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2.11%
expected rate
Fixed 24 Month Bond Quarterly
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. Yes
  4. Yes
Details...
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2.06%
expected rate
Fixed 18 Month Bond Quarterly
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. Yes
  4. Yes
Details...
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2.06%
Fixed 5 Year Bond Anniversary
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.05%
Fixed 4 Year Bond Monthly
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.05%
Fixed 4 Year Bond Anniversary
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
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2.02%
expected rate
Fixed 12 Month Bond Quarterly
  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. Yes
  4. Yes
Details...
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2.00%
Fixed 5 Year Bond Monthly
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. No
  4. No
Details...
Go to Site
 
Now showing 1 to 10 of 1077 results

Eligible deposits with UK institutions are protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme up to a maximum level of protection of £85,000 per person per institution.

Disclaimer:
All rates subject to change without notice. Please check all rates and terms before investing or borrowing.
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How do I choose the best savings account?

Choosing the right savings account isn't always easy, but it can be made far simpler with the help of our search tool. Simply enter a few details and we'll instantly show you a list of the deals that meet your requirements - it'll help you compare savings accounts across the market to find the one that meets your needs, and crucially, ensures you earn the highest savings rate in the process.

Things to look out for

However, it isn't all about the rate. There are plenty of things you'll need to bear in mind, from the kind of savings accounts you want to how you can manage it, with it all depending on your individual requirements.

For example, you'll need to make sure that the account in question can be operated via your preferred method. There are a growing number of savings accounts that are purely internet operated, which is fine for tech-savvy individuals, but not so good if you prefer to deal with your bank face-to-face. Similarly, some can only be operated in branch, which may not be suitable if there's no presence in your area.

It's for this reason that you'll want to thoroughly check the details of each savings account, looking at the small print as well as the headline rate, including everything from access and opening restrictions to account management and investment limits. You'll want to specify these kinds of requirements when using our search tool, and that way, you can ensure that you're not only getting the best savings interest rate, but that the deal perfectly meets your additional requirements.

What about the Personal Savings Allowance?

The Personal Savings Allowance (PSA) came into being in April 2016. It allows savers to earn up to a set amount in interest without being taxed; essentially, it's a tax-free allowance over and above the annual ISA limit, and means the majority of savers won't be taxed on any interest earned.

For basic rate taxpayers, the allowance has been set at £1,000 per year, while higher rate taxpayers have a £500 allowance and additional rate taxpayers don't get any. This means that UK savers have the chance to earn up to £1,000 in interest each year entirely tax-free, and given that savings rates are low, most won't be taxed at all.

However, it's important to bear in mind how savings interest rates could have an impact on your PSA. In a nutshell, the higher the savings rates, the more interest you'll earn, and the faster you'll reach your PSA limit. This means that, if you opt for the highest savings rate, a larger savings pot could easily breach the allowance. It's for this reason that a cash ISA will remain worthwhile, as all interest will be earned tax-free, regardless of the size of the pot.

Compare savings accounts

Here we outline the various kinds of savings accounts available, helping you narrow down the options and find the best solution to your savings requirements.

Easy access savings accounts

An easy access account is as simple as it sounds, most of the time at least. Generally, these savings accounts will allow you to add to your savings pot and withdraw funds as you wish, and it can often be opened with a small initial investment. They typically pay variable rates of interest, which means it can change at short notice; as such, you'll want to check the rate you're receiving on a regular basis, and make sure to be on the lookout for communications from your provider to be aware of any changes.

Nonetheless, these accounts should comprise a vital part of any saver's portfolio. They're ideal for emergency funds as you won't have to give notice to your savings provider to access your money, and although this kind of account tends to offer lower savings interest rates than its less accessible counterparts, the flexibility could be worth it.

However, there's recently been a rise in the number of accounts that come with restrictions, typically those that restrict access, which is why they're sometimes referred to as instant access or no notice accounts instead of easy access - because it isn't always that easy!

Some, for example, will only let you withdraw your cash a certain number of times a year, while others will only allow withdrawals through a linked current account, so it's important to check the small print of any deal you're considering before you take the plunge - even if it's got the best savings account rate available.

With a bonus or without? It's a good question, and the answer depends on your savings ideals. Savings accounts that come with a bonus will always need to be reviewed when the bonus element expires, as the rate can drop considerably. This means careful organisation is a must, but given that these accounts come with a guaranteed bonus element - unlike with full variable rate accounts, where the rate can change at any time and could easily fall below a typical bonus level - it could be a welcome trade-off.

Then there's the fact that variable savings accounts should always be reviewed on a regular basis anyway, given the nature of a variable rate. This means that reviewing a bonus account may not be too much of a change from the norm, in which case, the decision will often come down to the interest rates on offer in each sector - which is why you'll want to compare savings accounts in each Best Buy chart to get a complete picture of the options available.

Easy access quick view:

  • Variable rate - so can change at short notice.
  • Lower interest rates than fixed rate bonds and other more restrictive accounts.
  • Flexible - can be added to and withdrawn from at your leisure.
  • Great for an emergency fund.
  • Can come with a guaranteed bonus element.
  • Watch out for withdrawal restrictions

Notice savings accounts

Notice accounts are similar to their easy access counterparts in that they typically allow you to add funds whenever you wish, yet they'll require you to give notice to your savings provider before you can access those funds after they've been deposited. It's for this reason that they tend to offer better rates than easy access accounts, and again generally pay variable rates of interest.

The amount of notice required can vary wildly - some accounts may only ask you to give a month's notice, whereas others can require three months and above, with different savings interest rates being paid accordingly. Note that some accounts will let you bypass the notice period and access your cash instantly, yet this will often be subject to a loss of interest penalty, generally in line with the number of days' notice you were supposed to give.

It's for this reason that notice accounts aren't best suited to emergency funds, but if you're not comfortable with a fixed rate commitment, they could offer a suitable compromise between rate and flexibility, generally offering the best savings account rates among variable deals.

Notice account quick view:

  • Variable rate.
  • Typically pay higher savings interest rates than easy access, but lower than fixed rate bonds.
  • Can add funds whenever you wish.
  • You'll need to give the required notice period before you can access your cash, or forfeit some interest if you need earlier access (if allowed).

Regular savings accounts

Regular savings accounts allow you to save a set amount of money on a regular basis, and generally offer higher rates of interest than typical savings accounts. However, they tend to have low investment limits and restrict the amount you can deposit each month, so they won't be suitable if you have a significant lump sum that you want to squirrel away - but if you're after the best savings rates, they're hard to beat.

If you're getting into the savings habit, have a short-term goal in mind or want to commit to saving a set amount over a year (for example), these accounts could be a great way to do it. They can be variable rate or fixed, often depending on their specific requirements, which can vary wildly between accounts.

For example, some impose a penalty if you miss a monthly payment and won't allow access to funds until the term of the account is up, while others are a bit more flexible, allowing access at your leisure and not penalising you if a monthly payment is missed. It's all about comparing the options to find an account that meets your specific needs.

Regular saving account quick view:

  • Save a set amount of money each month.
  • Can be variable rate or fixed.
  • Often pay the highest savings rates, but have low investment limits.
  • Great for short-term goals.
  • May not be able to access your money before the end of a set term.

Monthly interest accounts

If you've got a significant savings pot, you may want to use it to supplement your income. That's where monthly interest accounts come in. These deals pay interest on a monthly basis, rather than annually, which means you could get a valuable boost to your monthly budget.

The caveat to this is that the interest rate on a monthly account will typically be slightly lower than that of an annual interest version - you'll want to look at the gross rate rather than AER for comparison - but it could be worth it to get interest paid on a regular basis.

Monthly interest savings accounts are commonly variable rate, typically easy access or notice accounts, but you'll be able to find versions of fixed rate bonds that pay interest on a monthly basis as well. Make sure that your chosen account allows the interest to be paid away, too - some require you to compound any interest earned, in which case they wouldn't be suitable for income generation.

Monthly interest accounts quick view:

  • Pay interest on a monthly basis rather than annually
  • Can be used to supplement your income
  • Can be variable rate or fixed
  • Typically pays lower rates than yearly accounts
  • Great for those with a healthy savings pot

Fixed rate bonds

Fixed rate bonds pay a fixed rate of interest for a set amount of time, the benefit being that you'll know exactly how much you'll earn for the full length of the term. The rate is guaranteed, unlike with a variable rate account, which can fluctuate according to market conditions or the providers' funding needs.

They're ideal for those who have a lump sum they want to invest, with most not allowing further additions after the initial deposit (and if they do, it'll only be for a short space of time). A true fixed rate bond won't allow access to funds until the full term is up, but some accept that access is sometimes necessary, however they'll typically charge you an interest rate penalty for any withdrawals.

For this reason, fixed rate bonds should only be considered by those who are comfortable with locking their money away for a set length of time - but given that these tend to offer the highest savings rates, it could be a commitment worth making!

Fixed bonds can be taken out over a variety of terms, too, typically ranging from one year to five years, but there can be variations either side of that. The savings interest rates offered vary accordingly, but the options are there, allowing you to choose your ideal account based on your individual requirements.

Fixed rate bonds quick view:

  • Fixed rate of interest paid over a set period of time.
  • Guaranteed returns.
  • Higher rates of interest than easy access accounts - typically pay the best savings account rates, second only to regular savers.
  • Terms typically range from one year to five+ years.
  • Usually don't allow further additions or withdrawals.
  • Great for those with long-term savings goals and a lump sum to invest.

Cash ISAs

Individual Savings Accounts, otherwise known as ISAs, offer a fantastic home for your savings. They allow interest to be earned tax-free, no matter how big a savings pot you have, offering ultimate tax-efficiency for the long term.

Cash ISAs can come in variable rate or fixed versions, much like traditional savings accounts, offering a range of easy access, notice and fixed rate options. You're allowed to save up to a set limit each tax year, known as the annual ISA allowance, which for 2017/8 has been set at £20,000.

You're only allowed one active cash ISA each year, but if you're not happy with it, you can transfer funds - together with any savings from previous years - to a new account. However, you'll need to follow set transfer rules to retain your pot's tax efficiency.

This means that, while you're only able to save a set amount each year, if you add to your pot over several years you could have a significant sum. This is why it's so important to find the best savings account interest rates possible, and why a cash ISA should still be a vital part of your portfolio, regardless of the Personal Savings Allowance (see below).

Cash ISA quick view:

  • Save up to a set amount each year (known as the annual ISA allowance, which for 2017/18 is £20,000).
  • Interest is earned tax-free.
  • Can be variable or fixed rate (access restrictions will vary accordingly).
  • Can only have one active ISA each tax year.
  • Funds must be transferred via a set process to retain tax-efficiency.

Children's savings accounts

There are a range of savings accounts designed specifically for children, which can be a great way to get children into the savings habit and help teach them the value of money. Many of these pay impressive savings interest rates and often come with added incentives, such as a moneybox, to give fledgling savers a little bit extra.

Much like with adult savings accounts, there are different options to choose from, ranging from variable rate instant access accounts to fixed rate bonds, and even the odd regular savings account. Their terms and conditions will vary according to the individual provider - some can be opened by children aged from seven to 17, for example, while others can be opened in trust for younger ages, and some don't allow access until the child turns 18.

Then there are Junior ISAs (or JISAs), which can be opened for children of any age by the parent or legal guardian. The money can't be accessed until the child turns 18, although they can manage their account from their 16th birthday. Much like with adult versions, JISAs have their own annual investment limit - the JISA allowance for 2017/18 has been set at £4,128 - and all interest is paid tax-free.

In most cases, interest will be tax-free from regular children's savings accounts, too, although the rules are slightly different, and there may be tax implications for parents who save large sums for their children.

Children's savings account quick view:

  • Typically available for children up to the age of 18.
  • Can be fixed or variable rate.
  • Potential tax implications for parents.
  • Junior ISAs can't be accessed until the child turns 18, and ensure that all savings interest remains tax-free until then.

Sharia'a compliant accounts

Sharia'a compliant accounts offer the same kind of facilities as mainstream offerings, with the difference being that they pay an expected profit rate rather than a set rate of interest. This is because, under Islamic law, the charging (or earning) of interest is prohibited.

These kind of accounts will use your money to generate profits through Sharia'a compliant means, rather than lending it out and charging interest, so any return on your money will be through the profits of those activities - your money will be invested rather than lent out.

However, your money won't be lent to businesses that provide goods or services that are against Islamic principles, such as tobacco, alcohol or gambling, which means that these accounts can also be great for those who want an ethical method of saving.

It's worth pointing out that, while expected profit rates are usually achieved, this may not always be the case, so you may get less of a return than you initially thought.

Sharia'a compliant accounts quick guide:

  • Pays an expected profit rate rather than interest, in line with Islamic law.
  • Money will be invested ethically rather than lent to businesses.
  • There's a chance you won't receive the expected profit rate.
 
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